Augmented reality – The future of makeup | _shift London

Yearly tech show, CES 2018, kicked off this week, inviting thousands of visitors to see the latest software, hardware and tech treats. Our highlight, YouCam Makeup.
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This article was originally published on _shift London

The International Consumer Electronics Show, CES, takes place in Las Vegas every year and is one of the biggest events for tech entrepreneurs to present their latest innovations.

YouCam Makeup currently leads the list of highlights that you shouldn’t miss, especially if you want to understand what’s behind the mirrors at Tom Ford’s recently launched beauty store at Covent Garden.

“Augmented reality has quickly become an incorporated part of our devices, manipulating and changing the ways we see ourselves and the world around it. I think it makes a subtle but natural fit with beauty stores as this method allows us to explore more options in one store visit,” says Sarah Mikaela, fashion blogger behind Framboise Fashion

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Part of Perfect Corp, the YouCam app describes itself as a smart cosmetic kit, that is equipped with the most accurate facial mapping technology to provide customers with the perfect virtual makeover. The app, that essentially makes the application of a dozen of cosmetics products in real-time possible, has also inspired luxury beauty brand Estée Lauder to take on this new beauty experience.

“We are thrilled to continue our pioneering partnership with YouCam to bring mobile-based Augmented Reality training to our Beauty Advisors around the world,” Estée Lauder global brand president Stephane de La Faverie told Business Wire in December last year. “We believe this is a turning point in beauty education and leveraging technology.”

The first ever Tom Ford beauty store in London’s Covent Garden incorporates a technique that is similar to the YouCam Makeup technology. Virtual reality try-on lipstick demonstrations and mirrors that act as a camera, educate customers about the products and provide them with beauty tutorials to take away. Rather than a standard beauty store, this one offers digital goodies and a makeup experience to remember. “I see obvious hygienic benefits with being able to try different shades without exposing yourself to unnecessary bacteria,” explains Mikaela who had been to the store recently for a one-to-one consultation.

Switching between a red lippy and a nude tone? Impossible without making your mouth look like you’ve just had a cheeky canoodle. And if you ever had a one-to-one with a professional makeup artist, you probably found yourself losing count of the products that have been applied to your face. What brush was that again? With a makeup tutorial in your pocket, these issues are gone for good.

“You don’t necessarily need a makeup artist or blogger to tell you what to use in order to achieve a certain look anymore. You can just try everything out yourself without lifting a finger,” says Carmen Wolfschluckner, fashion journalism student at the AMD.

Incorporating this technology into beauty stores improves the value of in-store experiences and gives makeup artists the opportunity to demonstrate multiple looks in one session. And it keeps technology and profession in balance. “It makes a subtle but natural fit with the beauty world that would only vary slightly in your reflection. You save that for when you need it, and I think it’s a great match,” says Sarah Mikaela.

Should all beauty stores upgrade to this innovative tool? “It can be harmless and fun for sure, but it depends on what you’re trying to mirror and alter about yourself,” explains Sarah Mikaela.

As long as it stays with beauty stores and makeup _shift considers it to be a great move.

 

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